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Xenoblade Chronicles X

Xenoblade X Info Compendium

Reddit thread that lists all the useful threads about Xenoblade X

/r/Xenoblade_Chronicles/

Map of Mira

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Linux

OpenVPN installer wget https://git.io/vpn -O openvpn-install.sh && bash openvpn-install.sh
List of Installed Packages dpkg –get-selections | grep -v deinstall > packages
wget  wget -A pdf,jpg -m -p -E -k -K -np http://site/path/

This will mirror the site, but the files without jpg or pdf extension will be excluded

Correct permissions /var/www sudo adduser $USER www-data

sudo chown $USER:www-data -R /var/www

sudo chmod +0775 -R /var/www

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Furries

A couple of Articles on Furries that were in my bookmarks.

Read This: For furries, it’s about identity, not sex

Furries have gotten an unjustified bad rap, according to a new article in The Guardian. In popular culture, from CSI to Entourage, furries are almost always shown as weird sexual fetishists who get their thrills skritching and yiffing in the fur pile. It turns out, most furries aren’t in it for the sex at all. As the Guardian piece explains,

“We researchers are horrified by that stuff,” says Kathleen Gerbasi, a social psychologist who has researched the furry community extensively. “Because it really doesn’t represent the reality we see in the fandom.”

In her experience, people have either never heard of furries or they have a wildly distorted idea of it. As a result, fur fandom have become far more stigmatized than other similar nerd niches, such as anime and cosplay.


How furries became a fandom

Long before the Internet itself was invented, Walt Disney and Warner Brothers invented furries.

Assuming that the Internet bred furry fandom is an easy assumption to make. It’s certainly the assumption I made, despite running with a crowd of scene kids and furries in Bush-era suburban Georgia. But furries—fans of anthropomorphic animals—go back both further and not as far as you might think.


What’s the Deal with “Furries?”

Furries. You might know them as “the people who dress up in the giant animal mascot costumes.” Or, depending on the media you consume, you may also know them as “the people who think they’re animals and have a weird fetish for fur.” Or, just as likely, you have never heard the term “furry” before outside the context of your pet dog or the neighbor with the back hair who mows his lawn without a shirt on every Saturday. Regardless of what you have or have not heard about furries, it might surprise you to learn that there is a team of researchers who have devoted their careers to studying this fandom. Perhaps even more surprising is what nearly a decade of research on the subject can tell us all about how we relate to animals, how we understand ourselves, and how we benefit from letting our inner child run wild every so often.

Epistle 3

http://www.marclaidlaw.com/epistle-3/

Dearest Playa,

I hope this letter finds you well. I can hear your complaint already, “Gertie Fremont, we have not heard from you in ages!” Well, if you care to hear excuses, I have plenty, the greatest of them being I’ve been in other dimensions and whatnot, unable to reach you by the usual means. This was the case until eighteen months ago, when I experienced a critical change in my circumstances, and was redeposited on these shores. In the time since, I have been able to think occasionally about how best to describe the intervening years, my years of silence. I do first apologize for the wait, and that done, hasten to finally explain (albeit briefly, quickly, and in very little detail) events following those described in my previous letter (referred to herewith as Epistle 2). Continue reading

The Brain on Trial

Advances in brain science are calling into question the volition behind many criminal acts. A leading neuroscientist describes how the foundations of our criminal-justice system are beginning to crumble, and proposes a new way forward for law and order.

ON THE STEAMY first day of August 1966, Charles Whitman took an elevator to the top floor of the University of Texas Tower in Austin. The 25-year-old climbed the stairs to the observation deck, lugging with him a footlocker full of guns and ammunition. At the top, he killed a receptionist with the butt of his rifle. Two families of tourists came up the stairwell; he shot at them at point-blank range. Then he began to fire indiscriminately from the deck at people below. The first woman he shot was pregnant. As her boyfriend knelt to help her, Whitman shot him as well. He shot pedestrians in the street and an ambulance driver who came to rescue them.

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2011/07/the-brain-on-trial/308520/